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The Last Notes

Humayun's tomb, the construction that inspired the Taj Mahal

Humayun's tomb, the construction that inspired the Taj Mahal

The tomb of Humayun (1508-1556), second emperor of the Mongol Empire, was the first garden-tomb that was built to honor the Mongol ruler, as commented on the Ancient Origins website. The monument was so spectacular that it inspired architectural innovations during the Mongol Empire, including the famous Taj Mahal in Agra, built a century after Humayun's garden-tomb.

Jan Hus, the Czech religious reformer

Jan Hus, the Czech religious reformer

On July 6, 1415, Jan Hus, a Czech theologian and philosopher, was burned at the stake after being declared a heretic at the Council of Constance (1414-1418). This year marks 600 years since those events and in the Czech Republic, July 6 is a national holiday in honor of this religious. On a day like today, we are going to meet the figure of Jan Hus.

Great archaeological finds in Da Nang, Vietnam

Great archaeological finds in Da Nang, Vietnam

During two-month excavations in the gardens of Khu Bac, the same site where 3,000-year-old stone axes were discovered a few weeks ago, in the city of Da Nang (Vietnam), more than 4,500 objects of about 3,000 have been found. years old, among which we can distinguish ceramics, stones, axes, coins and mollusk shells, as reported by the Vietnam Press Agency.

Excavations begin at the Great Basilica of Pliska

Excavations begin at the Great Basilica of Pliska

Professor Bozhidar Dimitrov, director of the Bulgarian National Museum of History, announced to the FOCUS news agency that the excavations in the Great Basilica of Pliska have started at 9:00 last Tuesday. officially thanks to funding from the Bulgarian Council of Ministers, which has provided money for archaeological excavations, studies and restoration in Pliska.

Exhibition «Monumental photography in the 19th century», at the BNE

Exhibition «Monumental photography in the 19th century», at the BNE

The creation of photography has to do with the search for a way to reproduce reality without having to draw it through the camera obscura. That is what the fathers of photography were looking for: Nicéphore Niépce (1765-133), Louis-Jaques-Mandé Daguerre (1787-1851) and Fox Talbot (1800-1877). Photography was born at the time of greatest production of works encyclopedic in nature and memory preservation.

Greek mythology: the myth of Medusa and the Gorgons

Greek mythology: the myth of Medusa and the Gorgons

If there is a character in Greek mythology that is known all over the world, it is the Gorgonas, three monsters whose names were Esteno, Euriale and Medusa, all three were daughters of the marine divinities Forcis and Ceto and despite the fact that Medusa was the only mortal, is the most famous of them all, who has appeared in countless chronicles about the adventures of the great Greek warriors and was even referred to in Roman mythology.

Jordan's Black Desert could be the key to understanding early farmers

Jordan's Black Desert could be the key to understanding early farmers

A team of archaeologists who have been working for a few years in the Black Desert of Jordan, have discovered the indications of how humans made the jump to agriculture. The team has found evidence of 14,000 years old that could allow to understand a new way culture and environment at the beginning of human civilization in the region.

Apollo sanctuary discovered in Greece

Apollo sanctuary discovered in Greece

Excavation work at the Despotiko archaeological site in Greece is bringing to light new information about the size and organization of a shrine, as reported by the Hellenic country's Minister of Culture. Archaeologists have been excavating the site since 1997 , under the supervision of Yiannos Kouragios, and little by little the outline of a sanctuary from the 6th century BC has been glimpsed.

They find properties of the Czech Germans expelled in 1945

They find properties of the Czech Germans expelled in 1945

Czech historians have recently found the belongings of a Czech-German family that had been hidden in an attic in 1945. One of the descendants of the family, currently 83 years old, guided the historians to the place where the one known as "the Sudeten Treasure" was found, which does not contain jewels or money but does have exceptional historical value.

An exhibition celebrates the 150th anniversary of the publication of

An exhibition celebrates the 150th anniversary of the publication of "Alice in Wonderland"

The Morgan Library and Museum invites visitors on an unforgettable journey into one of the most incredible stories ever told, Lewis Carrol's 'Alice in Wonderland'. The exhibition, 'Alice: 150 Years of Wonderland' which It will be open to the public until October 11, it is celebrated due to the 150th anniversary of the publication of Carrol's book.

September 11, 1973: the coup in Chile

September 11, 1973: the coup in Chile

September 11, 2001 is marked in the collective memory as a tragic day: members of the jihadist network Al-Qaeda crashed two planes into the Twin Towers in New York. About 3,000 people died and some 6,000 were injured, but September 11 is also the anniversary of another tragic day: the coup in Chile.

They find a bronze mold to make mirrors of almost 2,000 years in Japan

They find a bronze mold to make mirrors of almost 2,000 years in Japan

A fragment of the mold dating from around AD 200 was found during an archaeological excavation at the Sugu Takauta ruins in Kasuga. The mold appears to have been used to produce bronze mirrors known as Tachukyo, during the first half of the Yayoi Pottery Culture (300 BC-300 AD.

Centuries-old wreck discovered off the North Carolina coast

Centuries-old wreck discovered off the North Carolina coast

The sonar used in a scientific expedition has revealed the remains of an unknown wreck (piece of ship that has been wrecked) more than a kilometer and a half deep off the coast of North Carolina. Objects found in the junk indicate that the wreck may date back to the American Revolution.

They recover a Roman sarcophagus hidden by construction workers in Israel

They recover a Roman sarcophagus hidden by construction workers in Israel

The Israeli Antiquities Authority has recovered a Roman-era sarcophagus that construction workers intended to hide after unearthing it from a site where a building was being constructed. The limestone coffin, estimated to be around 1,800 years old. The antiquity and discovered last week during construction work on a neighborhood on the coast of the city of Ashkelon, has been described as unique by Gabi Mazor, a retired Israeli Antiquities Authority archaeologist and expert on the time.

Modern technology makes it possible to decipher a 1,500-year-old Hebrew scroll

Modern technology makes it possible to decipher a 1,500-year-old Hebrew scroll

State-of-the-art technology has allowed scholars to read for the first time the oldest Hebrew scroll found since the 'Dead Sea Scrolls', Israeli and North American experts have reported. The charred piece of scroll from the 6th century was found among the ash trees from a synagogue in Ein Gedi, on the Dead Sea coast, in 1970 but until now it had been impossible to read its contents.

Chicken farming was practiced in Israel 2,300 years ago

Chicken farming was practiced in Israel 2,300 years ago

According to a study published by the University of Haifa, chicken farming began in Israel 2,300 years ago. Samples of dozens of chicken bones found in Maresha, central Israel in an area of ​​the Hellenistic period, showed signs of having been cut and cooked. The study says that the commercialization of the chicken originated in Israel, as it explains Lee Perry-Gal, who led the study: "By examining the remains of the Maresha animals we have found the first evidence from the Middle East of the chicken industry."

Bronze Age skeleton discovered near Stonehenge

Bronze Age skeleton discovered near Stonehenge

A Bronze Age skeleton has been found by archaeologists at the University of Reading when they were excavating in Wiltshire's Pewsey Valley. Dating back about 4,000 years, the skeleton found is believed to have belonged to a teenager. A more thorough study will reveal the sex and age of the adolescent, where he came from, and invaluable information on diet and disease in the Bronze Age.

The International Criminal Court will judge the first accused of destroying historical and cultural heritage

The International Criminal Court will judge the first accused of destroying historical and cultural heritage

During this last year we have become used to knowing through the media the destruction of historical and cultural heritage in the Middle East area. These actions that destroy the cultural memory of humanity, it seems that they will not go unpunished or that, at least, they will try to prosecute in a judicial way.

2,000-year-old mummy found in northwestern Indiana

2,000-year-old mummy found in northwestern Indiana

Topographic studies have uncovered a mummy that may be 2,000 years old at the Singleton Stone quarry, south of Lake County, Illinois. Archaeologists will investigate whether they have found a Native American burial site. A team of archaeologists who moved to the site have found what appear to be the remains of a human mummy that had been there for hundreds of years.

New discoveries at the Porta Nola necropolis in Pompeii

New discoveries at the Porta Nola necropolis in Pompeii

The archaeological excavations that are being carried out in the Porta Nola necropolis, in Pompeii, have provided an infinite amount of information of great relevance and thanks to the work being carried out by a team made up of Spanish archaeologists, we receive new news about their work.