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The Last Notes

Discovery Documentary of Battleship Musashi by Paul Allen

Discovery Documentary of Battleship Musashi by Paul Allen

We want to share with you the two and a half hour long documentary of the expedition to discover the battleship Musashi, which was used in the Second World War. This discovery was made by Paul Allen, co-founder of Microsoft.After studying History at the University and after many previous tests, Red Historia was born, a project that emerged as a means of dissemination where to find the most important news of archeology, history and humanities, as well as articles of interest, curiosities and much more.

They find the skeleton of a mosasaur in Colombia

They find the skeleton of a mosasaur in Colombia

In the Coello area (Tolima), in Colombia, Luis Enrique Calderón, a teacher at the Girardot rural school, found the remains of a mosasaur, a marine reptile that dates back to prehistory, which was identified in an area near One of the best news that could be had is that the remains are practically complete and even have some tissues that have been preserved thanks to the substrates under which it was buried all this time.

The restoration of the Kinh Thien palace in Hanoi is prepared

The restoration of the Kinh Thien palace in Hanoi is prepared

The People's Committee of Hanoi (Vietnam) recently approved the restoration of the Kinh Thien Palace in the Thang Long complex in Hanoi. It is a construction that was erected in order to maintain the royal meetings during the Ly, Tran, Le and Nguyen dynasties.Excavations in this place began in February 2014 and for several years many researchers have advised a complete restoration of the palace although they lacked such important data on the architecture of the building and its measurements, since much of it was destroyed in 1886 by French soldiers.

They find the oldest fossil of the genus Homo

They find the oldest fossil of the genus Homo

An international team of researchers has announced the discovery of a fossil that belonged to a hominid. It is a jaw that has no less than 2.8 million years old, which thus becomes the oldest that has been found so far of the genus Homo, to which it belongs to modern man, which reveals that the evidence of the lineage of the human race dates back 500.

Four Harappan-era skeletons found in India

Four Harappan-era skeletons found in India

Four human skeletons about 5,000 years old have been found by archaeologists from the Haryana Department of Archeology, in collaboration with Seoul National University. They are from the Harappan civilization and have been found in the city of Rakhi Garhi, near Haryana. Professor Nilesh Yadav, who co-directs the project, has stated that it is the first time skeletons have been found during the excavation of the city, which started in 2012.

Detroit hosts an exhibition of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera

Detroit hosts an exhibition of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera

The Detroit Institute of the Arts has recently opened an exhibition they have called "Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo in Detroit." This is the first exhibition that allows us to reflect on the stay of both artists in this city of the United States. Mariana Sáinz Pacheco, deputy director of International Exhibitions of the National Coordination of Visual Arts, of the National Institute of Fine Arts, wanted to emphasize that It is a sample that has about 70 works, where the marvelous murals painted by Diego Rivera are taken as a starting point.

The era of the Anthropocene began in the 20th century

The era of the Anthropocene began in the 20th century

One of the great problems of the planet is the human race, who with the passage of time we have been changing all its geology, depleting its resources and leaving a mark that will persist for centuries and that will possibly remember us as a bellicose people, eager for resources and with very little respect for the planet that hosts us.

More information about the death of Richard III is revealed

More information about the death of Richard III is revealed

According to a new analysis carried out by researchers at the University of Leicester on the remains of the King of England Richard III, his death was due to the multiple blows he was given to the skull after he lost his protective helmet at the Battle of Bosworth Field. The study carried out on the monarch's bones reveals up to eleven wounds that were caused by different weapons, of which nine of them were on the skull; A very serious pelvic wound was also detected, which was inflicted after his death.

A mummified monk found inside a Buddha statue

A mummified monk found inside a Buddha statue

An incredible study in the Netherlands has revealed that a Chinese statue of Buddha dated between 1050 and 1150 actually contains the remains of a mummified monk. The study of the mummy was carried out under the supervision of Erik Bruijin, a expert in the field of Buddhist art and culture and guest curator at the World Museum in Rotterdam.

Found the tomb of a Celtic prince in France

Found the tomb of a Celtic prince in France

An exceptional tomb from the 5th century BC. that probably belonged to a Celtic prince has been unearthed on the outskirts of Lavau, in the French region of Champagne. The tomb contained Greek and Etruscan objects and was probably included within a business area, said the National Archaeological Research Institute (INRAP). ).

Madrid Book Night Program 2015

Madrid Book Night Program 2015

As every April 23, the Community of Madrid celebrates the Night of the Books, with the exception that this time the 10 years of the Night of the Books will be celebrated, an event that moves the entire city and attracts thousands of people from the entire country and the world to the capital. Hundreds of events will take place simultaneously between colloquia, book signings, presentations, readings, workshops, storytelling, gymkhanas, music, conferences and a host of other activities endow the city with a magic that only culture can deliver.

More information on the tomb of Jintakus in the Abusir necropolis

More information on the tomb of Jintakus in the Abusir necropolis

At the beginning of this year, Egypt surprised us again and to the southwest of Cairo the necropolis of Abusir was discovered. This area once again reveals more information about the history of an ancient queen about whom not much is known, thanks to the work carried out by Professor Salima Ikram, an Egyptologist and head of the Egyptology Unit at the American University of Cairo Together with a team of Czech archaeologists and researchers, they have been able to offer more news about this mysterious queen.

Tropical fire ants traveled the world in the 16th century

Tropical fire ants traveled the world in the 16th century

When we think of insects like ants, we all know that many of them do not fly and do not swim, but recently a discovery has been made that reveals that tropical fire ants traveled the world in the 16th century, although the news has its own Trick: This class of ants is considered the first to have traveled the world by sea and there is even documentation that shows that it is the first case of global invasion by a species.

MAXICULTURE project, the great ally of cultural heritage

MAXICULTURE project, the great ally of cultural heritage

Thanks to the advances we have today, we can conserve, know, consult and also disseminate cultural heritage, although it is very important to know what its socio-economic and technological effects may be, something that can be measured thanks to an innovative project called MAXICULTURE .

They extract DNA from giant kangaroo fossils

They extract DNA from giant kangaroo fossils

Scientists in Australia have managed to extract the oldest DNA from several fossils of two huge giant marsupials. It is believed that they inhabited the country about 40,000 years ago and as researchers have reported, the process has been truly difficult, although they are happy because they have clarified the family tree of modern kangaroos and wallabies.

Wars, another enemy of archeology

Wars, another enemy of archeology

One of the worst things that can happen in the world is a war, mainly because of the damage that it brings, where thousands of innocent people always die who are immersed in a conflict they never wanted. In addition to the personal victims, another thing that goes very wrong is history, where countless historical places have been turned to ashes due to projectiles, among others.

The beautiful and the ugly according to Leonardo da Vinci

The beautiful and the ugly according to Leonardo da Vinci

Until next April 5, at the Muscarelle Art Museum, at the College of William & Mary, in the North American state of Virginia, you can visit a formidable exhibition dedicated to the fascination that Leonardo da Vinci had for the beautiful and the ugly, being the first exhibition of its kind dedicated to the philosophy in this field of the Italian genius.

Kurgan hypothesis: new information on the origin of languages

Kurgan hypothesis: new information on the origin of languages

Different international linguists have reached an agreement on the languages ​​and have declared that languages ​​such as English, Greek or even Hindi, known as Indo-European languages, are direct descendants of a family of languages ​​that appeared from a common ancestor that was spoken a thousand years ago.

The skeleton of a woman found in Amphipolis would be Olympia, the mother of Alexander the Great

The skeleton of a woman found in Amphipolis would be Olympia, the mother of Alexander the Great

After having studied more in depth the remains found in the tomb of Amphipolis in Greece, experts and historians have highlighted that there are family ties between the five deceased and found in the tomb. Archaeologists have advanced that the remains of the woman who was between 60 and 65 years old, almost certainly is Olympia, the mother of Alexander the Great.

The mysterious Roman tombstone of Cirencester

The mysterious Roman tombstone of Cirencester

For the past two months, a team of archaeologists has been excavating a Roman necropolis just outside the town of Cirencester, a town in Gloucestershire, about 150 kilometers from London. In this place no less than 55 graves have been documented, some of which contained wooden coffins and some copper bracelets, although what most caught the attention of the researchers was a tombstone where it can be read: “For the spirit of the deceased Bodica (Boadicea), wife, lived for 27 years ”.