Category: Interesting

The Last Notes

Science and archeology together to find the origin of Malaria

Science and archeology together to find the origin of Malaria

A scientist at Yale University has developed a novel method to identify malaria in the bone marrow of ancient human remains, this being the first time that researchers have been able to establish a profile of the diagnostic skeleton for the disease, the which is transmitted by mosquitoes and continues to infect millions of people around the world.

New finds from the Pilbara excavations in Australia

New finds from the Pilbara excavations in Australia

Recent archaeological excavations on Barrow Island and the Montebello Islands, off the Pilbara coast, have revealed different objects that suggest they were part of the construction of a coastal dwelling attributed to the first humans of the area. Peter Veth, an archaeologist at the University of Western Australia, confirmed that they have found stone axes and that these were made earlier than originally believed.

Over 5,000 human remains reveal part of London's history

Over 5,000 human remains reveal part of London's history

In June of last year an archaeological investigation began at the entrance to Liverpool Street Crossrail station, where they investigated the large number of people buried between the 16th and 17th centuries. After almost a year, results have already started to be published and there is a lot of information about all 3.

Byzantine tombs found in Istanbul

Byzantine tombs found in Istanbul

Eight tombs from the Byzantine era have been unearthed during restoration work on a building on Istiklal Avenue in Istanbul. It is the first time that tombs of this type have been discovered in this area. During the restoration work a skull was unearthed, and it was then that the archaeologists of the Archaeological Museum of Istanbul began with the excavations and unearthed eight tombs dating from around the 4th centuries or V.

Neanderthals and Homo Sapiens for the first child

Neanderthals and Homo Sapiens for the first child

Although many advances are being made to understand many of the characteristics of our ancestors, human evolution, especially the one that goes back the most in time, is the one with the most information gaps and therefore, when an important discovery is made, it is celebrated like never before.

They find a great treasure of gold coins in Israel

They find a great treasure of gold coins in Israel

A few weeks ago, what is considered to be the largest treasure of gold coins discovered in the country was found in Israel. It was exactly at the bottom of the old port in the Caesarea National Park. As reported by the group of divers from the diving club, at first they thought it was a plastic coin from some game, but later, after checking that it was It was a real coin, they notified the club director about the find.

They discover a secret room in the Temple of Sidon

They discover a secret room in the Temple of Sidon

A team made up of a delegation from the British Museum and a group of archaeologists from the General Directorate of Antiquities of Lebanon have recently discovered in the archaeological site of Frêres, in the town of Sidon, an underground room of which there was no absolute knowledge .

"The power of maps", round table at the BNE in streaming on 04/22 at 7:00 p.m.

After studying History at the University and after many previous tests, Red Historia was born, a project that emerged as a means of dissemination where you can find the most important news of archeology, history and humanities, as well as articles of interest, curiosities and much more. In short, a meeting point for everyone where they can share information and continue learning.

Wellcome Images, more than 100,000 completely free images

Wellcome Images, more than 100,000 completely free images

Wellcome Collection is a London museum that has always stood out for its risky bets to bring culture to the world as something closer, exhibiting countless works from different disciplines and managing to leave no one indifferent to what they had before their eyes It is an establishment that is part of the Wellcome Trust, a charity that was founded in 1936 by the billionaire pharmacist Henry Wellcome, the same year in which he passed away.

Study reveals important facts about Vikings

Study reveals important facts about Vikings

The Vikings are always remembered in the history books as authentic barbarians, thirsty for blood and who devastated everything they found in their path in northern Europe. In a way that may be true, but the Vikings were much more than barbarians, although surely not as fierce or murderous as they are portrayed.

Excavations begin on the Waterloo battlefield

Excavations begin on the Waterloo battlefield

The place where the Battle of Waterloo took place has become fashionable again after 200 years of the event that changed the course of history. This place, declared as European Heritage in 1914, is the only one that has been completely preserved as a protected area, but despite this it is a corner that can be visited.

The History of Poker Texas Hold'em

The History of Poker Texas Hold'em

Poker Texas Hold'em is the best known and most played variety of poker in all games of the card game. But until this variant acquired its fame, poker had to go through many stages in history. From the appearance of its suits, its extension to the new continent or its poker gambles crossing the Mississippi, let's review the unknown history of the best known variant of poker.

The United States returns to Iraq 60 pieces stolen during its occupation

The United States returns to Iraq 60 pieces stolen during its occupation

The thefts of ancient objects have always existed since man was a man and due to this, the opportunity to learn more about certain towns, regions or famous people in history has been lost, with objects stolen from the place where they were and surely sold in any antiques market or in the case of objects of great value, in the hands of private collectors.

The Pyramid of Menkaure and the Sphinx of Giza reopen to the public

The Pyramid of Menkaure and the Sphinx of Giza reopen to the public

Despite the socio-political instability that Egypt is experiencing, it is not always bad news that comes to us from that country. One of the best news in terms of history and archeology has arrived very recently and it will surely be an incentive for those who go or plan to visit this millenary country full of treasures.

An Italian cemetery could hold the key to the evolution of cholera

An Italian cemetery could hold the key to the evolution of cholera

For more than 1,000 years, what is now the area near the Badía Pozzeveri Abbey, in the heart of Italy's Tuscany, was used as a local cemetery and for many generations this cemetery hosted many people who died from plague epidemics. This necropolis is no longer a place where oblivion reigns, but it is a great treasure for researchers because thanks to the remains that lie there they want to carry out an in-depth study to know what the health of Europe has been and in this way find answers to some diseases that today continue to kill thousands of people.

Wheat DNA reveals that 8,000 years ago Britain was not an island

Wheat DNA reveals that 8,000 years ago Britain was not an island

DNA tests conducted not too long ago reveal important cultural connections between Britain and continental Europe about 8,000 years ago. The researchers found evidence in a variety of wheat at a submerged archaeological site off the coast of England, 2.

Researchers reveal the importance of geopolitics in the Aztec world

Researchers reveal the importance of geopolitics in the Aztec world

According to the results obtained by a large international team of researchers, it is revealed that during the Aztec era there was great geopolitical complexity and shed light on how the relations between the ancient states could have been, where issues that went beyond what was the war or the own expansion of its town, subjects like the commerce and also the flow of merchandise that arrived.

Ice Age humans hunted in North America about 13,300 years ago

Ice Age humans hunted in North America about 13,300 years ago

As the latest research shows, prehistoric Ice Age humans hunted camels and horses roughly 13,300 years ago, long earlier than was first believed. The journal Proceedings has published Mike Waters' study , director of the Center for the Study of First Americans at the University of Texas, and colleagues from the Universities of Calgary and Danish University of Aarhus.

They restore the head of a bronze horse that belonged to Lorenzo de 'Medici

They restore the head of a bronze horse that belonged to Lorenzo de 'Medici

After being stored in the Archaeological Museum of Florence for more than a century, a bronze horse head that belonged to Lorenzo de Medici (EL Magnifico) is in the process of being restored. The bronze sculpture dates from 350 BC. It is considered one of the masterpieces of classical Greek art and was exhibited in the Palazzo Medici in the center of Florence until the Medici family ceased in popularity, at which point it began to deteriorate little by little until it was acquired by the Archaeological Museum in 1881.

Clay tablets explain what life was like for Jewish exiles in Babylon

Clay tablets explain what life was like for Jewish exiles in Babylon

There is nothing more comforting for lovers of history and archeology than to look out on the Internet balcony and discover the infinity of news that comes from different parts of the planet that help us understand many details about the way of life of many people, details about different objects and prints that can shed more light on something than previously believed.