Category: Collections

The Last Notes

Barns from Roman times discovered in Tripoli

Barns from Roman times discovered in Tripoli

Some 1,900-year-old structures were discovered during archaeological excavations in the ancient city of Tripoli. According to official sources, the structures were used as granaries. The head of the excavations, Professor Bahadir Duman from the Department of Archeology at Pamukkale University, explained that the excavations began in March.

They will carry out DNA tests on the priestess of Chornancap

They will carry out DNA tests on the priestess of Chornancap

Specialists from the Peabody Museum of Archeology and Ethnology at Harvard University will analyze the DNA of the remains of a skeleton from the Chornancap site, that of a priestess, a woman of the high hierarchy of the Lambayeque culture, to determine her genetic history. The study will also investigate the relationship of this personality with the rest of the people with whom it was buried.

Greek mythology: the myth of the Three Graces

Greek mythology: the myth of the Three Graces

Anyone who has read a book on mythology and legends of Ancient Greece or even who has studied history in school or high school, will surely remember, even vaguely, the Three Graces, who we are going to talk about in this post They were three goddesses daughters of Zeus and the nymph Eurinome, who in turn was the daughter of the famous titan Ocean.

A Jesuit church from the 18th century allows to know aspects of colonial Mexico

A Jesuit church from the 18th century allows to know aspects of colonial Mexico

Five years ago, 20 mummies were found under an ancient temple of the Society of Jesus in Mexico. The archaeologist Francisco Montoya Mar declared that this discovery is a 'window' to the history of the city of Zacatecas of the 18th century. The National Institute of Anthropology and History affirmed in a statement that the study of these remains is a great opportunity to know the life of different sectors and its course from colonial times to independent Mexico.

Restoration of a palace of the First Caliphate on the Sea of ​​Galilee

Restoration of a palace of the First Caliphate on the Sea of ​​Galilee

The Department of Ancient Studies at the University of Gutenberg has received € 30,000 through the Cultural Preservation Program of the German Federal Foreign Office to help with the restoration of a Caliphate palace on the shores of the Sea of ​​Galilee. The palace complex covers a square of 5.

Spanish museums, accessible to the blind

Spanish museums, accessible to the blind

Workers at the Prado Museum, one of Spain's most important art museums, normally warn visitors not to touch the museum's treasured works, but recently José Pedro González, 56, has been putting his fingers on a copy of one of the most famous works of the master Velázquez, 'La fragua de Vulcano'.

Satellite images confirm the destruction of the temple of Baal in Palmyra

Satellite images confirm the destruction of the temple of Baal in Palmyra

The Islamic State had already confirmed the destruction of the temple of Baal in Palmyra by spreading images of the destruction of the thousand-year-old site, one of the jewels of the Syrian city of Palmyra, declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. The United Nations Institute for Training and Research demonstrated the temple blasting through satellite imagery.

560,000-year-old human fossil found in France

560,000-year-old human fossil found in France

A 16-year-old French volunteer has been the author of the discovery of the tooth of a 560,000-year-old adult in an excavation in the south-west of France. found during excavations. We know it must be about 550 years old.

The 'Peking Man' used fire 600,000 years ago

The 'Peking Man' used fire 600,000 years ago

New evidence of the use of fire by 'Peking Man', ancestor of modern man, has been found 600,000 years ago at an archaeological site near Beijing. Archaeologists have spent three years excavating in western Beijing and according to Gao Xing, a researcher at the Institute of Paleontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, a place to make fire and burned rocks and bones were discovered at the site.

François Gobinet, author of the first photograph of Girona who was in Dublin

François Gobinet, author of the first photograph of Girona who was in Dublin

The National Library of Ireland kept the first photograph of the city of Girona, the one dated around 1852, it is a view of the Onyar river. Currently in the place is the Iron Bridge, which when the photograph was taken was not yet built. The Girona City Council's Center for Research and Dissemination of the Imaging (CRDI) received the image that was kept in Dublin.

The first flower on Earth appeared in what is now Spain

The first flower on Earth appeared in what is now Spain

200 years ago the first fossilized specimens of Montsechia vidalii were found in Montsec but at first it was doubted whether it was a plant, a kind of lichen or a moss. A group of American, French and Spanish researchers have now proven that Montsechia is the first angiosperm, that is, the first flowering plant in the fossil record.

Geophysical studies seek the location of a grave of the victims of the

Geophysical studies seek the location of a grave of the victims of the "Invincible Armada"

On September 20, 1588, two large ships of the Spanish navy sank off the west coast of County Clare, Ireland. About 800 men perished in the waters of the sea. It is believed that the mortal remains of these men ended up miles away. One of the points they are thought to have reached is Tuama na Spainneach, located in County Claire, in the Republic of Ireland.

1982 Lebanon War: the Sabra and Shatila Massacre

1982 Lebanon War: the Sabra and Shatila Massacre

Sabra and Chatila refer to the names of two towns located in West Beirut. During the 1982 Lebanon War, in these towns there were Palestinian refugee camps. Background to the Lebanon War The 1982 Lebanon War, also known as the First Lebanon War, was an armed conflict that took place between 6 and 22 February. June 1982.

They find in South Africa a chasm of bones with a new hominid species: Homo Naledi

They find in South Africa a chasm of bones with a new hominid species: Homo Naledi

Two years ago, Lee Berger recruited people on social media to explore an 18-centimeter-wide crevasse where a shipment of human fossils was thought to be found. More details of the excavation at Rising Star Cave, 50 kilometers from Johannesburg, were released this week.

The sword of the last Viking?

The sword of the last Viking?

This sword was found in Langeid, in Bygland in Setesdal in 2011. It is a truly unique sword from the last Viking era, embellished with gold, with inscriptions and other ornamentation. The discovery of the sword had not been published until now, when it was first exhibited to the public at the Museum of History in Oslo.

Rare blue pigment discovered in paintings from the Roman period of Egypt

Rare blue pigment discovered in paintings from the Roman period of Egypt

According to Egyptian beliefs, blue was the color of the skies and also of the universe, being related to water and the Nile, that is why they were so fond of it and even created what is considered to be one of the first artificial pigments known to the world. man and named Egyptian Blue in his honor.

They discover a Thracian sanctuary under a mosque in Bulgaria

They discover a Thracian sanctuary under a mosque in Bulgaria

A large Thracian sanctuary, which may be a necropolis, has been discovered in the city of Karlovo by Bulgarian archaeologists who were excavating a 15th century mosque, a historical monument from when Bulgaria was part of the Ottoman Empire. Thracian has been made public thanks to Kostadinov Kisyov, director of the Plovdiv Museum of Archeology, who participates as an expert in the evaluation commission of the excavations in the mosque.

Nieves Valentín is awarded the National Prize for Restoration and Conservation of Cultural Assets

Nieves Valentín is awarded the National Prize for Restoration and Conservation of Cultural Assets

The jury has awarded the National Prize for Restoration and Conservation of Cultural Assets to Nieves Valentín Rodrigo, with an endowment of 30,000 euros, based on "his professional career in the field of conservation of cultural heritage and control of boideteria, endorsed by national and international organizations and for the innovative and sustainable nature of their contributions, especially in the development of non-toxic treatments to control deterioration in museum collections and documentary collections.

The Netherlands and the Rijksmuseum want to buy two works by Rembrandt

The Netherlands and the Rijksmuseum want to buy two works by Rembrandt

The marriage of Maerten Soolmans and his wife Oopjen Coppit were a marriage of the commercial elite of the Dutch Golden Age. The couple's names are not well known to the general public, but in 1634 Rembrandt immortalized them in two of his most famous portraits. They posed to demonstrate their economic might and paid 500 florins to Rembrandt.

Who were the Greek Muses?

Who were the Greek Muses?

In Ancient Greece the great divinities that existed could be counted by dozens, but not only were there goddesses but there were also what we know as muses. Who were the muses? They were also divinities, but not with as much power as the goddesses. According to the scholars of that time, the muses were the most important inspirers there were, inspiring of music, love, art, science, poetry, etc.