The world's largest submerged archaeological site found in Mexico

The world's largest submerged archaeological site found in Mexico

A team of underwater researchers from the Great Mayan Aquifer Project (GAM) has discovered the largest submerged archaeological site in the world When connecting flooded cavern systems Sac Actun and Two Eyes in Tulum, in Quintana Roo (Mexico), resulting in a 347-kilometer underwater cave.

Robert Schmittner, GAM project manager and his team of divers began this phase in March 2017, although Schmittner had been searching for this connection for 14 years and adding new tunnels and galleries.

These almost 350 kilometers underground have become time tunnels, protecting among others the remote and recent history of Quintana Roo, containing evidence from remote times to the first settlers of America and the Mayan culture.

«This immense cave represents the most important submerged archaeological site in the world, since it has more than a hundred archaeological contexts, among which are evidence of the first settlers of America, as well as extinct fauna and, of course, the Mayan culture«, Assured Guillermo de Anda, researcher at the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) and director of the Great Mayan Aquifer.

Via: GAM

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