Found the tomb of a Celtic prince in France

Found the tomb of a Celtic prince in France

A exceptional tomb from the 5th century BC. which probably belonged to a celtic prince It has been unearthed on the outskirts of Lavau, in the Champagne region of France.

The tomb contained Greek and Etruscan objects and it was probably included within a business zone, said the National Archaeological Research Institute (INRAP). Thanks to this discovery, the researchers believe they will be able to obtain more data on the trade in the Iron Age in Europe.

An INRAP team has been excavating the site since last October and they have dated the site to roughly the end of the First Iron Age. The burial mound found was 40 meters wide and in its heart a burial chamber of 14 square meters was found where they found the deceased with his car.

«It is very likely that it is a local Celtic prince", said Dominique Garcia, president of INRAP. Added that it is one of the largest burial chambers found from this period and he mentioned that it is a finding «exceptional«, Not only because of its size but also because of the quality of the material unearthed.

The 5th and 6th centuries BC they were characterized by the rise of the Etruscan and Greek city-states like Marseille, in the south of France. In this context, Mediterranean merchants opened channels of negotiation with continental Celts looking for slaves, metals and other goods that they could offer.

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Video: Huge tomb of Celtic in France 2,500 year old