Chub SS-329 - History

Chub SS-329 - History


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Chub

A game fish of the Atlantic and Mediterranean. The name is also given locally to a wide variety of American fishes.

(SS-329: dp. 1,526; 1. 311'9"; b. 27'3", dr. 15'3"; s. 20
k.; cpl. 66; a. 1 5", 10 21" tt.; cl. Gato)

SS -329, originally named Bonaci, was renamed Chub on 24 September 1942 and launched 18 June 1944 by Electric Boat Co., Groton, Conn., sponsored by Mrs. T. A. Risch; and commissioned 21 October 1944, Commander C. D. Rhymes, Jr., in command.

Chub reached Pearl Harbor from New London 24 January 1945, and after final training, put to sea for action waters 13 February. Her first war patrol, in Tonkin Gulf and the Java and South China Seas, found her skill and determination tried in four hairbreadth escapes from destruction. On 3 March, she was attacked by an enemy submarine whose torpedoes she evaded. On 29 March, she began a long surface chase after an escort group, which she carried through the next day, even though forced six times to go deep by enemy aircraft. On their last pass, they dropped bombs, a clear indication that Chub's chase must be broken off.

The next day she was off Yulikan Bay, and while American and Japanese planes fought in the skies above, Chub rescued three downed pilots as they and she were strafed. With two Japanese patrol craft looming out of the harbor, Chub raced away. On 12 April, Chub was bombed by an enemy patrol plane as the submarine dove. Bomb damage caused a temporary loss of power, and with depth control lost, Chub broached. Fortunately, the aircraft had apparently dropped its entire load on the first run.

Chub put in to Fremantle to repair and refit from 18 April 1945 to 14 May, and then sailed for the Java Sea and her second war patrol. During this patrol, she attacked two freighters, and sank the minesweeper W-14 which had come out hunting for her. The damage already done to Japanese shipping made targets few by this time, and Chub put in to Subic Bay from 21 June to 15 July to refit. Her third war patrol found her again in the Java Sea, sinking a number of small craft, although again and again attacked by the remnant of Japanese air strength. Returning to Fremantle 17 August, she sailed on to Subic Bay for training through the remainder of 1945, then returned to the west coast.

During 1946, Chub operated from Pearl Harbor, her new home port, visiting the west coast for necessary overhaul. Between 12 November 1946 and 14 February 1947, she served in the Far East, making a simulated war patrol, and training with the 7th Fleet. During late 1947, she joined in a training cruise in Alaskan waters, and voyaged from Seattle to San Francisco with reservists on board for training. After overhaul at San Francisco she put to sea 4 March 1948 to call at New London, then crossed the Atlantic and Mediterranean to Izmir, Turkey, arriving 11 May. She was decommissioned 23 May 1948, and transferred to Turkey 2 days later. She is known in the Turkish Navy as Gur.

Chub received three battle stars for World War II service by reason of her three "successful" war patrols.


Operational history

USS Chub

SS-329, originally named Bonaci, was renamed Chub on 24 September 1942 and launched 18 June 1944 by Electric Boat Co., Groton, Conn. sponsored by Mrs. T. A. Risch and commissioned 21 October 1944, Commander C. D. Rhymes, Jr., in command.

First war patrol, February – April 1945

Chub reached Pearl Harbor from New London 24 January 1945, and after final training, put to sea for action waters 13 February. Her first war patrol, in Tonkin Gulf and the Java and South China Seas, found her skill and determination tried in four hairbreadth escapes from destruction.

On 3 March, she was attacked by an enemy submarine whose torpedoes she evaded. On 29 March, she began a long surface chase after an escort group, which she carried through the next day, even though forced six times to go deep by enemy aircraft. On their last pass, they dropped bombs, a clear indication that Chub's chase must be broken off.

The next day she was off Yulikan Bay, and while American and Japanese planes fought in the skies above, Chub rescued three downed pilots as they and she were strafed. With two Japanese patrol craft looming out of the harbor, Chub raced away. On 12 April, Chub was bombed by an enemy patrol plane as the submarine dove. Bomb damage caused a temporary loss of power, and with depth control lost, Chub broached. Fortunately, the aircraft had apparently dropped its entire load on the first run.

Second and third war patrols, May – August 1945

Chub put in to Fremantle, Australia to repair and refit from 18 April 1945 to 14 May, and then sailed for the Java Sea and her second war patrol. During this patrol, she attacked two freighters, and sank the minesweeper W-34 which had come out hunting for her. The damage already done to Japanese shipping made targets few by this time, and Chub put in to Subic Bay from 21 June to 15 July to refit.

Her third war patrol found her again in the Java Sea, sinking a number of small craft, although again and again attacked by the remnant of Japanese air strength. Returning to Fremantle 17 August, she sailed on to Subic Bay for training through the remainder of 1945, then returned to the West Coast.

1946 – 1947

During 1946, Chub operated from Pearl Harbor, her new home port, visiting the west coast for necessary overhaul. Between 12 November 1946 and 14 February 1947, she served in the Far East, making a simulated war patrol, and training with the 7th Fleet. During late 1947, she joined in a training cruise in Alaskan waters, and voyaged from Seattle to San Francisco with reservists on board for training.

After overhaul at San Francisco she put to sea 4 March 1948 to call at New London, then crossed the Atlantic and Mediterranean to İzmir, Turkey, arriving 11 May. She was decommissioned and struck from the Naval Vessel Register 23 May 1948.

Honors and Awards

Chub received three battle stars for World War II service by reason of her three "successful" war patrols. She is credited with having sunk a total of 4,200 tons of shipping.

TCG Gür

The ex-Chub was transferred to Turkey on 25 May 1948, and was commissioned in the Turkish Navy as TCG Gür (S 334). In 1953, she was converted to a GUPPY Fleet Snorkel Submarine, the work being done first in Turkey's Gölcük Navy Yard and completed in the United States.

Ultimately, Gür was decommissioned, returned to US custody, and sold for scrapping.


World War II Database


ww2dbase USS Chub was commissioned into service in late 1944 and embarked on her first war patrol in Feb 1945. Her first sinking was achieved during her second war patrol in May 1945 in the Java Sea, a Japanese transport, and she would go on to destroy several more targets in the same region through the end of the war. After the war, she served with the US Navy in the Pacific Ocean until 1948 when she was transferred to Turkey. Renamed Gür, she received GUPPY I conversion work at Gölcük Naval Shipyard in Turkey and at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Pennsylvania, United States between 1953 and 1954. In 1954, she received the hull number of D-3, and in 1955 S-20, and finally in 1959 S-334. In 1975, Gür was decommissioned and was returned to the United States. She was sold to the Zidell Explorations of Portland, Oregon, United States for US$55,459.00 in May 1976 for scrap.

ww2dbase Source: Wikipedia

Last Major Revision: Jun 2012

Submarine Chub (SS-329) Interactive Map

Chub Operational Timeline

24 Sep 1942 The planned submarine Bonaci was renamed Chub.
16 Sep 1943 The keel of submarine Chub was laid down by the Electric Boat Company in Groton, Connecticut, United States.
18 Jun 1944 Submarine Chub was launched at Groton, Connecticut, United States, sponsored by Mrs. T. A. Risch.
21 Oct 1944 USS Chub was commissioned into service, Commander C. D. Rhymes, Jr. in command.
24 Jan 1945 USS Chub arrived at Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii.
13 Feb 1945 USS Chub departed Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii for her first war patrol.
3 Mar 1945 USS Chub was attacked by a Japanese submarine but was able to escape unharmed.
29 Mar 1945 USS Chub spotted a Japanese convoy in the Java Sea and began pursuing the ships, attacked by patrolling aircraft in the process.
30 Mar 1945 USS Chub rescued three American airmen off Yulikan Bay, Hainan island, China.
12 Apr 1945 USS Chub was attacked by a Japanese aircraft, sustaining temporary loss of power and depth control.
18 Apr 1945 USS Chub arrived at Fremantle, Australia, ending her first war patrol.
14 May 1945 USS Chub departed Fremantle, Australia for her second war patrol.
20 May 1945 USS Chub attacked a Japanese convoy in the Java Sea, sinking a transport with one of four torpedoes fired.
21 May 1945 USS Chub sank a Japanese ship in the Java Sea, hitting her with one of five torpedoes fired.
30 May 1945 USS Chub attacked a Japanese convoy in the Java Sea both torpedoes missed.
1 Jun 1945 USS Chub gave chase to a Japanese convoy in the Java Sea, firing two spreads of three torpedoes on separate occasions all torpedoes missed.
14 Jun 1945 USS Chub sank a Japanese ship in the Java Sea, hitting her with one of five torpedoes fired.
21 Jun 1945 USS Chub arrived at Subic Bay in central Luzon, Philippine Islands, ending her second war patrol.
15 Jul 1945 USS Chub departed Subic Bay in central Luzon, Philippine Islands for her third war patrol.
24 Jul 1945 USS Chub sank a Japanese tug in the Java Sea with her deck gun.
5 Aug 1945 USS Chub attacked a Japanese convoy in the Java Sea, sinking one ship with a torpedo and sinking a tug and a patrol vessel with her deck gun two torpedoes were expended in the attack.
9 Aug 1945 USS Chub sank a small Japanese vessel in the Java Sea with her deck gun.
11 Aug 1945 USS Chub attacked a Japanese convoy in the Java Sea with her deck gun, sinking one small ship and damaging a patrol vessel.
17 Aug 1945 USS Chub arrived at Fremantle, Australia, ending her third and final war patrol.
12 Nov 1946 USS Chub began a scheduled overhaul.
14 Feb 1947 The scheduled overhaul work for USS Chub completed.
4 May 1948 USS Chub departed New London, Connecticut, United States.
11 May 1948 USS Chub arrived at Izmir, Turkey.
23 May 1948 USS Chub was decommissioned from service at Izmir, Turkey and was transferred to the Turkish Navy.
25 May 1948 Submarine Gür was commissioned into service.
28 May 1948 Submarine Chub was struck from the US Naval Register.
5 Mar 1954 Submarine Gür entered Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania, United States for the second phase of her GUPPY I conversion.
3 Sep 1954 Submarine Gür completed her GUPPY I conversion work at Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania, United States.
12 Dec 1975 Submarine Gür was decommissioned from service and returned to the United States.
22 May 1976 Submarine Chub/Gür was sold to Zidell Explorations of Portland, Oregon, United States for scrap.

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References

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John Bradin Kleinstuber Collection

Type of Resource: Video: MiniDV [2 items] -- Oral history interview Manuscript: Biographical information [2 items] -- Typewritten document Manuscript: Diaries and journals [1 item] -- Mixed (handwritten and typewritten documents) Manuscript: Military papers (orders, personnel/201 files, etc) [3 items] -- Typewritten document Manuscript: Periodicals [1 item] -- Mixed (handwritten and typewritten documents) Photograph: Digital print [14 items] -- Photographs Computer File: CD [1 item] -- Multiple types of electronic files Interviewer: Benjamin Leone Interviewer: Mario J. Leone Interviewer: Susan M. Gavin-Leone Contributor: Benjamin Leone Contributor Affiliation/Organization: Boy Scouts of America Collection #: AFC/2001/001/60347 Subjects: Kleinstuber, John Bradin World War, 1939-1945--Personal Narratives United States. Navy. Cite as: John Bradin Kleinstuber Collection
(AFC/2001/001/60347), Veterans History Project, American Folklife Center, Library of Congress


USS CHUB SS-329 Framed Navy Ship Display

This is a beautiful ship display commemorating the USS CHUB (SS-329). The artwork depicts the USS CHUB in all her glory. More than just an artistic concept of the ship, this display includes a custom designed ship crest plaque and an engraved ship statistics plaque. This product is richly finished with custom cut and sized double mats and framed with a high quality black frame. Only the best materials are used to complete our ship displays. Navy Emporium Ship Displays make a generous and personal gift for any Navy sailor. in all her glory. More than just an artistic concept of the ship, this display includes a custom designed ship crest plaque and an engraved ship statistics plaque. This product is richly finished with custom cut and sized double mats and framed with a high quality black frame. Only the best materials are used to complete our ship displays. Navy Emporium Ship Displays make a generous and personal gift for any Navy sailor.

  • Custom designed and expertly engraved Navy crest positioned on fine black felt
  • Artwork is 16 inches X 7 inches on heavyweight matte
  • Engraved plaque stating the ship vital statistics
  • Enclosed in a high quality 20 inch X 16 inch black frame
  • Choice of matting color options

Please note that colors shown may not be 100% true due to different monitor configurations.


The Loss of USS BULLHEAD (SS-332)

On 31 July 1945, USS BULLHEAD (SS-332) left Fremantle, Australia on her third war patrol, her crew probably hoping for a bit more action than they had experienced previously. On the first they had pulled lifeguard duty, rescuing three airmen, and bombarded radio installations in China. During the second they sank four small ships, totaling 1,800 tons, and damaged three more. This time they were headed to the Java Sea to join a wolfpack with USS CAPITAINE (SS-336) and USS PUFFER (SS-268) then, on 5 September, they would proceed to Subic Bay to patrol on their own.

On 6 August, BULLHEAD reported that she had passed through Lombok Strait. When CAPITAINE arrived six days later, she tried to contact BULLHEAD to set up a scouting line for the following day. She received no answer. On 15 August, CAPITAINE reported, “Have been unable to contact BULLHEAD by any means since arriving in area.”

At the time, the area was fairly crawling with subs—USS COD (SS-224), USS CHUB (SS-329), CAPITAINE, and PUFFER, as well as the British HMS TACITURN and HMS THOROUGH—and since most experienced at least one enemy attack, it is difficult to pinpoint the one that sank BULLHEAD. But Japanese records examined after the war point to one on 6 August, when BULLHEAD was presumably cruising on the surface off the coast of Bali. She was spotted by a Japanese Mitsubishi Ki-51 and attacked with depth charges. Two were direct hits in the ten minutes that followed, the plane observed gushing oil and air bubbles rising from beneath the waves. It is assumed that the tall mountains on the land shortened BULLHEAD’s radar range, thus preventing her from picking up the airplane in enough time to dive.

BULLHEAD was the 52 nd and final American submarine lost during World War II. She sank with a crew of 84 men aboard.


Chub SS-329 - History

1,526 Tons (surfaced)
2,424 Tons (submerged)
311' 9" x 27' 3" x 16' 10"
10 × 21-inch torpedo tubes
(6 forward, 4 aft)
1 x 5" gun
1 x 40mm AA
1 x 20mm AA

Wartime History
Afterwards, conducted a brief shake down cruise off New London, CT but bad weather hampered effective training and only ten practice runs were made and three torpedoes fired. Next, departed with USS Lionfish (SS-298) from New London southward to Key West, Florida and continued training. During the trip, a dive was made to 600' while a "secret device" was tested. Afterwards, proceeded via the Panama Canal to Balboa in Panama and was assigned to Submarine Squadron Three and underwent additional training making more practice approaches and fired 26 torpedoes that were all retrieved and reused. Bullhead departed Balboa to Pearl Harbor and underwent minor repairs. Next, departed with USS Tigrone (SS-419) made daily trim dives while the crew continued to conduct training exercises before arrival at Guam.

First War Patrol
On March 2, 1945 departed Guam on her first war patrol under the command of Commander W. T. Griffith to wage unrestricted submarine warfare and performed life guard duty in the northern South China Sea operating with USS Tigrone (SS-419), USS Blackfish (SS-221) plus USS Seahorse (SS-304). During the patrol, Bullhead rescued three crew members from a B-29 Superfortress off the coast of China. Afterwards, bombarded radio installation on Pratas Island off China. On April 27, 1945 ended the patrol at Subic Bay and the next day moored along side of USS Barns (DE-353).

Second War Patrol
On May 21, 1945 departed on her second war patrol under the command of Commander W. T. Griffith to patrol the Gulf of Siam (Gulf of Thailand) then to the South China Sea and operated off Brunei Bay on northern Borneo. During this patrol, she sank two small freighters, schooner and a sub chaser with a total of 1,800 tons. Also, claimed to damage two other subchasers and another small freighter patrolling the western Java Sea. Each of these targets were sunk while surfaced with gunfire from her 5" deck gun. On July 2, 1945 the patrol ended at Fremantle.

Third War Patrol
On July 31, 1945 Bullhead departed Fremantle under the command of Lt. Commander Edward R. Holt, Jr. to patrol the Java Sea as part of a wolf pack with USS Capitaine (SS-336) and USS Puffer (SS-268) until September 5, 1945 then to proceed to Subic Bay. On August 6, 1945 Bullhead reported passing through the Lombok Strait but was never heard from again. On August 12, 1945 USS Capitaine (SS-336) attempted to contact Bullhead without reply and on August 15, 1945 reported " Have been unable to contact Bullhead by any means since arriving in area." Transiting the same area were other Allied submarines including HMS Taciturn, HMS Thorough, USS Cod (SS-224) and USS Chub (SS-329). When Bullhead failed to make contact or return it was officially listed as Missing In Action (MIA).

Sinking History
On August 6, 1945 after passing through Lombok Strait Bullhead was near the coast of Bali in the Java Sea at roughly Lat 8º 20'S Long 115º 42'E. Spotted by Japanese Army Air Force (JAAF) Type 99 Assault Plane / Ki-51 Sonias from the 73rd Independent Chutai armed with depth charges or 60kg bombs that claimed two direct hits. For ten minutes after the hits, the Sonias observed a large amount of oil and air bubbles rising to the surface. Possibly, the submarine's proximity to shore shortened the range of her radar and failed to detect the approaching aircraft. When lost, Bullhead was the last U.S. Navy (USN) submarine sunk due to enemy action in World War II and earned two battle stars for her World War II service.

Memorials
The each member of the 84 crew remain listed as Missing In Action (MIA) and each earned the Purple Heart, posthumously. All likely died inside the submarine when sunk August 6, 1945. All were officially declared dead on August 23, 1946. Each crew member is memorialized at Manila American Cemetery on the tablets of the missing.

The crew are also memorialized at Fremantle on the Allied Submarine Plaque. Also with a plaque at the USS Bowfin Submarine Museum & Park waterfront memorial overlooking Pearl Harbor.

Lt. Commander Holt earned the Navy Cross, Presidential unit Citation with two Stars, Asiatic Pacific Campaign Medal, World War II Victory Medal, Philippine Liberation Medal with star, Submarine Combat Patrol Insignia and Purple Heart, posthumously.

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Sacagawea

While at Fort Mandan, Lewis and Clark met French-Canadian trapper Toussaint Charbonneau and hired him as an interpreter. They allowed his pregnant Shoshone Indian wife, Sacagawea, to join him on the expedition.

Sacagawea had been kidnapped by Hidatsa Indians at age 12 and then sold to Charbonneau. Lewis and Clark hoped she could help them communicate with any Shoshone they𠆝 encounter on their journey.

On February 11, 1805, Sacagawea gave birth to a son and named him Jean Baptiste. She became an invaluable and respected asset for Lewis and Clark.


02 Product Lines

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Clipless Vertical Pouch

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Clipped Chub Film

CRYOVAC ® brand chub film is used to create clipped chub packaging for pumpable, solid foods including fresh and cooked meats, sausage, pet foods, and alternative proteins. These thin and durable barrier films help extend shelf life and can also seal without a flap, so graphics are visible around the entire package and food safety can be optimized.


Watch the video: Chubby Mermaid