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The flight of the first birds: two Spanish fossils shed light on their evolution

The flight of the first birds: two Spanish fossils shed light on their evolution

The aerodynamic study of Concornis lacustris and Eoalulavis hoyasi, two small birds from the Las Hoyas site (Cuenca), indicates that they were able to use an undulating ‘jumping’ flight 126 million years ago, typical of many modern species. This finding shows that birds developed strategies to improve their flight efficiency at a very early stage in their evolution.

The oldest drawing in history was shaped like a 'hashtag'

The oldest drawing in history was shaped like a 'hashtag'

In Blombos Cave, on the southern coast of South Africa and east of Cape Town, some of the first evidence of human cultural activity has appeared, such as shell beads, engraved pieces of ocher or tools made from rock siliceous, called silcreta, among all these objects dating back to about 70.

Find of great value in a church in Peru

Find of great value in a church in Peru

During some restoration work carried out in the church of San Francisco de Asís, in the Peruvian city of Maras, about 25 kilometers from Cuzco, a crypt with skeletal remains and the original murals dating back to the 16th century have been found, which they were covered with more current works of art in the 17th century.

The history of the inhabitants of the Ice Age is rewritten

The history of the inhabitants of the Ice Age is rewritten

A study has recently been published in the journal Nature showing different changes in prehistoric European populations. This is demonstrated by the genome analysis carried out on 51 individuals who colonized the European continent, with respect to these people, it must be taken into account that the last Ice Age was about 100 ago.

Sweden returns to Polynesia ancient skulls extracted in the 19th century

Sweden returns to Polynesia ancient skulls extracted in the 19th century

Ten human skulls that were collected in the 19th century in French Polynesia by Swedish explorers, have been returned by members of a group of indigenous Polynesians at a ceremony in Sweden. The skulls were brought to Sweden in 1884 by the Swedish archaeologist Hjalmar Stolpe, and they have been kept in the universities of Stockholm and Uppsala.

They will carry out DNA tests on the priestess of Chornancap

They will carry out DNA tests on the priestess of Chornancap

Specialists from the Peabody Museum of Archeology and Ethnology at Harvard University will analyze the DNA of the remains of a skeleton from the Chornancap site, that of a priestess, a woman of the high hierarchy of the Lambayeque culture, to determine her genetic history. The study will also investigate the relationship of this personality with the rest of the people with whom it was buried.